Within this pillar, MeP focuses on improving the areas of Landscape Conservation, Local Food Production and Fresh Water Management.

Menorca has a strong tradition of rural landscapes and agriculture activities. At present, this sector owns approximately 75% of the land but only contributes 3 or 4% of the economy. Menorca is home to an overwhelming diversity of Mediterranean habitats that host endemic plant and animal species exclusive to the island, some of which are in danger of being extinct. It also lies on an important bird migration route between Europe and Africa, which contributes to the variety of bird species one can see at different times of the year.

In 1993 Menorca was declared a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve. Biosphere Reserves are declared where there exists an important natural and cultural heritage and where society has accepted an economic development model compatible with the conservation of nature. A reserve of the Biosphere is an agreement between man and his natural surroundings and as a Biosphere Reserve, Menorca is part of the World Network of Island and Coastal Biosphere Reserves, which is a UNESCO MAB Programme aiming to foster sustainable development on islands and coastal areas and promote adaptation and mitigation strategies on climate change.

As a result, Menorca has a strict landscape protection policy. However, there is still much work needed to support the local food production community and to make the most of our natural environments.

Over the past few years there has been a big impulse on the island to develop a model for sustainable farming and encourage the use on KM0 (local food) products. One of the main pillars of being a Biosphere Reserve is food production and therefore it is essential to create public policies, committed to the primary sector and which help us work towards a sustainable island.

In addition, fresh water is Menorca’s biggest problem with regards to sustainability and has been a matter of debate for the last 25 years. The progressive lowering of the piezometric water levels in the 80s along with the increased amounts of pollution due to salt and nitrate infiltrations in the 90s, became indicators that Menorca’s water resources had significant deficiencies. It is estimated that water from 1 in 3 wells on the island exceeds the maximum levels of salinity permitted for human consumption, as well as having excess nitrates.

Menorca’s average water consumption per person is above the state average at approx. 330 litres a day in comparison to the rest of Spain’s average 250 litres per day. This is mostly due to excess consumption in urbanizations and tourist areas, put towards non-endemic gardens and lawns, as well as water evaporation from swimming pools. A large percentage is also used in farming across the island, and the lack of efficient rain-water catchment systems is a pressing issue to be tackled.

Based on this, Menorca Preservation aims to support local organisations developing and improving their work on sustainable farming and local, organic food production, as well as supporting the diversification of the economic sector and placing strong support on local food as a key element to Menorca’s economy. MeP is very keen to support plans to improve fresh-water management going forward, growing both the quantity and quality of fresh water on Menorca.

Sustainbility grants

  • Radio Far – KM0

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  • Festival Internacional de Cine Menorca

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  • GOB – Custodia Agraria 2021

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  • Paiños Feeding Areas – Isla del Aire

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  • 2nd COVID-19 Emergency Food Project

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  • Ornithological Society Conference II

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  • Festival de Cine de Menorca | Menorca Film Festival 2020

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  • COVID-19 Emergency Food Project

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  • GOB – Local Produce Diversification

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  • Ateneu de Mahón | Pollution & Us

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  • GOB | Fresh Water Project – Phase 2

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  • Environmental Education Project

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